Robert Wm. Gomez's

The Ultimate In-Box Notification Noise

I have discovered the best sound to use for a new mail notification in your e-mail client. It's the object pick-up noise form Atari's Adventure for the 2600. I've attached the WAV file to this post so that you to can feel like you are grabbing the goblet next time you get a v!@gr@ ©ialis spam in your in-box!

Terminator Salvation (6/10)

For the first 20 minutes or so I couldn't see why this film got such bad reviews. I was really enjoying it. And then they introduce the "love interest" and the story starts to focus on the jaded sci-fi trope of the robot who thinks he's a man. There are plot holes galore and editing jumps that feel like place holders for commercials. We don't care about the new terminator, all we want to see is the story of John Conner and Kyle Reese. At the very least, there are enough nods to fanboys to keep it watchable until the end (the digital surprise cameo is jaw-dropping).

Adobe Contribute Is No Longer My Friend

I have a bit of a love/hate relationship with Adobe. Some of their products are great—Photoshop is a verb these days for good reason—but, they have also released some of the most disappointing software I have ever used. Encore, their DVD authoring program, will crash anytime you try to do anything with even a moderate degree of complexity. Dreamweaver will give you cryptic JavaScript errors out of the blue, when you are not actively editing anything. Heck, everyone knows Acrobat is a bloated resource hog.

Mirror's Edge on PC (9/10)

Mirror's Edge

Mirror's Edge is another free-running inspired game like Assassin's Creed. But unlike Assassin's Creed, the acrobatic roof running is actually an integral part of the game mechanics and fun. With its puzzle-based level design, this game has much more in common with Portal than anything else.

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (8/10)

The series chugs along. Number three is still the best movie of the series, but this one performs as expected. The kids in secondary roles are all growing up to be weird looking young adults who have yet to master their craft.

Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies by C. S. Forrester (6/10)

I was disappointed when I came to the realization that this was more of a collection of short stories rather than a full novel. The tales aren't bad, but I would have preferred a much more grandiose story arc to end of the Hornblower series.

Lord Hornblower by C. S. Forrester (7/10)

Starts out nicely with Hornblower sent off to deal with a mutinous crew and keeps up the pace for about half of the book. Things begin to slow down near the end when the war with the end of the Napoleonic wars. Although, the return of some old firends from previous books is a welcome turn. So far, the initial trilogy of Hornblower novels are looking like the high point in the series.

Commodore Hornblower by C. S. Forrester (6/10)

A disappointing follow-up to the last Hornblower novel. This one has Hornblower in Russia helping out during the siege of Riga. Maybe a little too much politics for my taste.