Robert Wm. Gomez's

Elvis Presley by Elvis Presley (9/10)

Format: 
CD

This is so much better than the overrated Clash album that stole its cover design. I think people forget just how raw and rollicking Elvis when he burst on the scene. I came to appreciate Elvis in reverse. I liked his cheesy film soundtracks before I ever really gave these early songs a chance. Elvis lives!

Stop Me Before I Kill! (8/10)

This is a good film noir from the six movie Icons of Suspense Collection: Hammer Films DVD set. There is plenty of psychological drama and over-the-top acting. Aside from the female lead's weird Italian accent, I found all the characters intriguing. The tight pacing keeps it moving and there are plenty of interesting twists and turns along the way. I especially like the opening shot in which the camera slowly pulls back to reveal a horrible car crash.

The Future and its Enemies by Virginia Postrel (8/10)

Postrel makes the case for decentralized, dynamic systems. The obvious application of this is in free-market versus command-style economies, but she goes beyond these standard libertarian talking points to show how dynamic systems can create a better future in everything from urban planning to hair styling. Standing against the dynamists are the enemies of the future, the stasists: change fearing reactionaries and rule obsessed technocrats.

Floyd Lloyd & the Potato 5 Meet Laurel Aitken by Potato 5, The Featuring Floyd Lloyd Seivright (8/10)

Format: 
CD

This CD has a bit of a branding problem. Is it a Potato 5 record? Laurel Aitken? Floyd Lloyd? In any event, this is a ska record from the 90's with a very first-wave sound. Ska like this is good, albeit incredibly formulaic. I can only take so much of it and, thankfully, this is a short nine song album. I like to put on "Jesse Jackson" and watch news coverage of the Blago trial (injecting "Junior" after the chorus).

DDD by Poster Children (8/10)

Format: 
CD

Poster Children finally return to form after their less-than-stellar New World Record CD. I guess they decided to forget about all their buggy CDROM content and focus on the music for a change. There are still hints of the experimentation in some of the songs, but most of the surprise is gone and the rocking far outweighs the novelty factor. I really like "This Town Needs a Fire" and "Zero Stars," and I also really dig the two instrumental tracks.

New World Record by Poster Children (5/10)

Format: 
CD

Well, the Poster Children's run of awesome albums ends here at about track 3. I like the inclusion of synths and always appreciate over-production, but the band makes some really questionable choices here. For example, "Ankh" features a silly, low-pitched vocal part? Most of the tracks come off as experimental B-sides and they're just boring.

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (6/10)

After a gruesome and exciting start, this film loses steam fast. Peter Cushing never comes off as creepy and evil as I think the film makers wanted him to be... and this is including the tacked on rape scene. His co-stars aren't any more convincing either. This movie seems to be mostly a hodge podge of ideas and missed opportunities. However, I did like the cringe inducing (yet bloodless) brain surgery bit.

RTFM by Poster Children (9/10)

Format: 
CD

This record starts out with a bang and is almost as good as Junior Citizen. A couple of the songs near the end aren't quite up to the level as the rest of the album (something about "King of the Hill" just annoys me), but overall another great record. The CD contains a bunch of interactive CDROM content that is now obsolete on a modern PC. Thank you Macromedia!

Originally when I reviewed this album I wrote the following: