POF Archive: April 2017

I have been writing this drivel for decades. Browse through my archives by clicking the links below.

Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson (8/10)

This was my first cyberpunk novel (if you don't count getting stuck in Neuromancer on the IIgs). I thought it was pretty good but the middle of the book is bogged down explaining the main motivation of the bad guys via an overly long dive into Sumerian history and biblical references that would make John Galt complain about the length.

Submitted by Robert Gomez on Sat, 04/29/2017 - 14:55

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb (8/10)

Another big book about risk from Taleb filled with math, anecdotes, history and Fat Tony. This time it's all in service of his idea of anti-fragility: systems that are improved by stress and disorder. Again, there's a lot in this book that is over my head but I found myself highlighting and picking up quite a bit. He would argue that reading (and re-reading) difficult books increases one's anti-fragility and makes you better. So there.

Submitted by Robert Gomez on Thu, 04/27/2017 - 15:07

The Neon Demon (5/10)

Although billed as a thriller, this is just art film garbage. I guess the point is to show of awful and cutthroat the world of high fashion modeling is? Meh. It's pretty and every frame is a visual treat but the wooden acting and dumb story keep this from being anything but mediocre.

Submitted by Robert Gomez on Fri, 04/07/2017 - 20:23

Metti, Una Sera A Cena
Ennio Morricone - CD (10/10)

I know I say this about every Morricone record I own, but seriously, this is one of his absolute best scores. Certainly it's the best of his late 60's easy listening pop soundtracks. There's just a great mix of styles that all work together from bossa nova, to lush orchestrations, to a trippy sitar track and, of course, Edda Dell'Orso.

Submitted by Robert Gomez on Tue, 04/04/2017 - 12:24

Indagine Su Un Cittadino Al Di Sopra Di Ogni Sospetto
Ennio Morricone - CD (10/10)

In my mind, this ranks up there with The Good, The Bad and The Ugly as one of Morricone's most memorable scores. It has that Italian crime feel, but the arrangements are filled with unexpected sounds like banjo, mouth harp and wood fish. All this underscores the fantastical premise upon which the film is based. The CD includes several versions of the same songs which make it feel a little more repetitive than it actually is. But hey, more is better, right?

Submitted by Robert Gomez on Sat, 04/01/2017 - 19:25