Welcome to Pages of Fun!

This is the personal Web site of Robert Wm. Gomez. I am an artist, musician and nerd living in Chicago, Illinois who has been maintaining this site (in one form or another) since 1996. Enjoy your visit!

Major Overhaul of Planet Pimp Web Site

Did you know I maintain an informational resource page dedicated to Planet Pimp Records (the greatest record label ever to exist)? Well, now you do, and today I uploaded a massive update to the site. This is mostly behind the scenes stuff that makes the site easier for me to update, but I have also added some new features including links to external video and audio. There have also been some fancy style tweaks so the site now scales to fit mobile devices.

PRF Activity Book Submission

This was a drawing I created to be part of the PRF 2015 Activity book. It was to be a book full of in-jokes and references to the bands and people of the PRF music community. There was a desperate last-minute call for submissions, so I obliged and stayed up into the wee hours of the night putting this together. Of course they didn't use it and I feel like I completely wasted my time and energy. Oh well.

Resonance on PC (5/10)

Resonance Screen Shot

Uh oh, here we go again with another mediocre adventure game. Surprisingly, this one comes from Wadjet Eye Studios whose games have all been really good to me up until this one. On the surface Resonance has a lot going for it: well done pixelated graphics, a decent score and some clever twists on point-and-click interaction. However, the story and characters never grabbed be.

Yesterday on PC (4/10)

Yesterday

I've had pretty good luck with the string of adventure games I've played lately. It was inevitable that sooner or later I'd come across a dud. Yesterday had promise. I was initially drawn to the slick graphics (well, slick for a point and click game). However, the game is bogged down with nonsensical puzzles and an uneven tone to the story.

My First Foray into SASS

As I mentioned a few posts ago, this site has received a major theme overhaul. Aside from a couple form element styles, this change was mostly structural and behind-the-scenes. The new theme is my first foray into using the SASS CSS preprocessing language. Let me tell you, it was a revelation. SASS allows you to write CSS using a super-clean tabbed coding style and (finally) allows the use variables and expressions in styles.

Devil May Cry 4 on PC (3/10)

Devil May Bore 4

Started out okay enough despite the idiotic button mashing mechanics. But, man, this game became pure tedium by the ending. If there was a story here, it was totally lost on me. Just a bunch of feathery haired leather-boys jumping around and killing Raggedy Anne dolls. Is this what console gaming is like? What a bore.

Field / Noise by Zebras (8/10)

Format: CD

This is a limited issue, three track CD I picked up at a Zebras show. The songs are unlabeled and it's in a hand made CD sleeve. Zebras mix synthesizer rhythms with noisy guitar. The result is at times funky, other times metal-y but the dominating mood is a hard edged, weird Devo-inspired sound. I forget how much I liked this band live.

Another Site Update

Well, recently I've been trying to learn how to use SASS for styling Web pages and have kinda fallen in love with it. So here is my first go at it in the form of a new site template. Not much has changed visually, but, trust me, there have been a ton of changes behind the scenes. I will post more about this and the trials of retrofitting a Drupal theme for SASS sometime in the near future. In the meantime, look at the neat comments buttons I made!

C'est Chic! by Various Artists (9/10)

Format: CD

Another great 60's girl group compilation from Ace Records. I think I like the Italian girl singers CD a tad bit more, but this is pretty great. Of course there are songs written by Serge Gainsbourg including the classic, "Laisser tomber les filles" (sung by France Gall). A solid compilation and a great introduction to yé yé.

World War Z (3/10)

Well, the book wasn't great, but at least it was a new twist on the zombie genre. The movie is just terrible. The book was a meticulous telling of the logistics of fighting zombies on a global scale. The film just follows Brad Pitt from place to place where he doesn't do much of anything. And, once again, sigh... fast zombies. I mean really fast zombies.

Mad Max: Fury Road (10/10)

This movie was essentially one continuous car chase, but, as terrible as that sounds, it works perfectly. Back when I was 13, I was just the right age when Beyond Thunderdome came out and I loved it. I was not soured on the Mad Max brand and waiting for some sequel to redeem the series. So, for me, Fury Road isn't so much a return to form as it is just another ramping up in quality. What makes this movie so excellent is the unrelenting sense of danger. As I often paraphrase from Joe Bob Briggs: in this film, anyone can die at any moment.

A Bullet for the General (5/10)

The story of a finely attired gringo mercenary who falls in with a group of banditos in a scheme to steal weapons and support the revolution. Definitely not the most exciting spaghetti western I have seen (what, no gun duels!). Klaus Kinsky is tragically underused and the leads are fairly wooden. It's mostly a heavy-handed attempt at lefty political nonsense... rich Americans are evil. We get it.

Edge of Tomorrow (8/10)

This Tom Cruise action film is basically Groundhog's Day meets Starship Troopers. Since Groundhog's Day there must have been half-a-dozen rip-offs on various TV shows and made for Disney Channel movies (even the excellent Run Lola Run was essentially the same concept). It's an idea that just works no matter how crappy the vehicle. Edge of Tomorrow does it better than most by constantly building on the characters and plot, and ramping up the stakes as the timeline resets itself.

Curse: The Dark God Book 2 by John D. Brown (7/10)

Despite an exciting opening, the second book in this series is not as good as the first. The stakes aren't as high and it feels like a lot of set up for the next book.

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